“The negative consequences of car dependency.”

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Idea credit: Bluegill.

The conclusion first:

Car-centric towns are isolating, discriminatory, expensive, harmful to small businesses, and bad for public health. In contrast, walkable, human-oriented communities tend to be the happiest and healthiest and the most financially productive types of places to build and retain.

Let’s focus on building places that cater to the needs of humans, not the needs of cars.

Another outstanding entry from Strong Towns.


THE NEGATIVE CONSEQUENCES OF CAR DEPENDENCY, by Andrew Price (Strong Towns)

The majority of American towns and cities are built around the automobile. From multi-lane highways to vast paved parking lots, our communities have been shaped around a single mode of transportation over the last seventy years. While this may feel like progress, it has also harmed ourselves and our towns in ways that will be felt for generations.

Today I’m going talk about some of the negative consequences of car dependency and how a more walk-friendly, human-scaled development pattern would make us all better off. Specifically, I’m going to talk about them from the perspective of a town or suburb that has gone all-in on the auto-oriented pattern of development, where car travel and storage is prioritized over any other mode of transportation, and where the entire community is designed around car use.

Some of these negative consequences are:

Social isolation
Discrimination
Expense
Decline of small businesses
Effect on public health

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